Safety Watch the 2017 Solar Eclipse

Countdown to the Solar Eclipse

On Monday, August 21st, we will have the opportunity to witness a partial solar eclipse here in Central Florida! The eclipse will begin at 1:19 PM, reach its maximum coverage at 2:51 PM and will end at 4:15 PM.

[wpdevart_countdown text_for_day=”Days” text_for_hour=”Hours” text_for_minut=”Minutes” text_for_second=”Seconds” countdown_end_type=”date” end_date=”21-08-2017 13:19:46″ start_time=”1502814106″ end_time=”0,1,1″ action_end_time=”hide” content_position=”center” top_ditance=”10″ bottom_distance=”10″ ][/wpdevart_countdown]

      Begins: Mon, Aug 21, 2017 at 1:19 pm
      Maximum: Mon, Aug 21, 2017 at 2:51 pm
      Ends: Mon, Aug 21, 2017 at 4:15 pm
      Duration: 2 hours, 55 minutes
      Magnitude: 0.87

Watch the Solar Eclipse Safetly

I know it will be an exciting bit history to be able to witness a solar eclipse! However, it is important that you do not look directly at the eclipse at any point of time without the proper safety gear.

Solar Eclipse Certified Glasses

The ideal way to view a solar eclipse is through certified solar eclipse glasses. You will be able to view the eclipse directly.
However, if you are looking to buy your glasses now, most vendors are either sold out or they will arrive too late. But don’t fret!
There are other ways you can enjoy this momentous occasion!

Pinhole Projection

Pinhole Projection is a NASA-approved method of indirectly viewing the sun. For this project, have your back facing the sun. Your hands must be in the shape as though you’re ready to give a high-five. Cross the fingers of one of your hands over the fingers of the other. Look at your hands’ shadow on the ground. The small crevices between your fingers will project an image of mesh on the ground. For the viewing of our partial eclipse, these images will reveal the Sun’s crescent shape

If the area where you are viewing the eclipse is shaded by trees, the leaves’ shadows will act as a natural Pinhole Projection.

View other Projection projects you can use during the August 21 Solar Eclipse Here: https://eclipse.aas.org/eye-safety/projection

Cameras

If you have a professional or semi-professional camera, you should be able to record the solar eclipse without the need to look directly at it. We do recommend using a camera filter to project the lens of your camera, however.

Others may be thinking to use your cell phone to view the solar eclipse. Although, it will be difficult not to look at the sun while you try to aim your camera. Having eye protection is still recommended for this method. Now, cell phone cameras lenses are so small that it shouldn’t damage the lenses but to be on the safe side either put filter on the camera or set the phone’s settings to receive less light when viewing the eclipse.

We hope you are all prepared and enjoy 2017’s Solar Eclipse on August 21st!

by Deanna Oxner

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